Climate Change

Small islands, whether located in the tropics or higher latitudes, have characteristics which make them especially vulnerable to the effects of climate change, sea-level rise, and extreme events (very high confidence) ♦  Sea-level rise is expected to exacerbate inundation, storm surge, erosion and other coastal hazards, thus threatening vital infrastructure, settlements and facilities that support the livelihood of island communities (very high confidence). ♦  There is strong evidence that under most climate change scenarios, water resources in small islands are likely to be seriously compromised (very high confidence). ♦  It is very likely that subsistence and commercial agriculture on small islands will be adversely affected by climate change (high confidence). IPCC 4th Assessment Report, 2007

Climate Change and Agriculture

Documents

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Link to Guidebook: Technologies for Climate Change Adaptation - Agriculture Sector Link to Guidebook: Technologies for Climate Change Adaptation - Agriculture Sector

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Date added: 11/14/2011
Date modified: 11/14/2011
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Technologies for Climate Change Adaptation - Agriculture Sector

Document linked to :http://tech-action.org/Guidebooks/TNA_Guidebook_AdaptationAgriculture.pdf

This guidebook presents a selection of technologies for climate change adaptation in the agriculture sector. A set of 22 adaptation technologies are showcased. These are based primarily on the principles of agroecology, but also include scientific technologies of climate and biological sciences complemented by important sociological and institutional capacity building processes that are required for climate change to function.

The technologies cover:
• Planning for climate change and variability
• Sustainable water use and management
• Soil management
• Sustainable crop management
• Sustainable livestock management
• Sustainable farming systems
• Capacity building and stakeholder organisation.

Authors: Rebecca Clements, Jeremy Haggar, Alicia Quezada, Juan Torres
UNEP, August 2011

Food security in the Pacific and East Timor and its vulnerability to climate change Food security in the Pacific and East Timor and its vulnerability to climate change

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Date modified: 11/14/2011
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This report deals with food security and climate change in 15 Pacific Island economies in terms of the four traditional food security pillars:

1. Adequacy (enough food on a consistent basis, either through local production or imports or food assistance from outside sources);

2. Availability (ability of households and individuals to acquire food);

3. Stability (resilience of food supplies to external shocks, such as natural disasters);

4. Utilisation of food at the household level, especially by those with low incomes (requiring that people are healthy enough to process the food internally, and have adequate safe water and sanitation and food hygiene and child-care skills).

In the Pacific context, safety and nutrition (food that is fresh or properly preserved and contributes to a healthy diet) are equally important and are included as a fifth pillar. Adequate food security has existed only intermittently in the region in the past and food shortages and famine conditions continue to occur, largely as a result of natural weather-related events.

Prepared for the Australian Government Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency by the Secretariat of the Pacific Community in conjunction with CSIRO

© Commonwealth of Australia 2011

Fiji Ministry of Agriculture – Presentation on Climate Change Issues in Fiji (2009) Fiji Ministry of Agriculture – Presentation on Climate Change Issues in Fiji (2009)

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Date added: 03/25/2010
Date modified: 06/06/2010
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A presentation providing an overview of some climate change issues faced by the Agriculture sector in Fiji. Presented during the project Fiji national planning workshop, May 2009.

Authors: Ms Maria Elder & Mr Moti Lal, Fiji Ministry of Primary Industries
Date: May 2009

Economic Costs of the 2009 Floods in the Fiji Sugar Belt and Policy Implications Economic Costs of the 2009 Floods in the Fiji Sugar Belt and Policy Implications

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Date added: 06/25/2010
Date modified: 06/25/2010
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The January 2009 floods in Fiji were reported as the worst in the history of the country since the 1931 floods. Many parts of the country were affected by a number of consecutive flood events that spread over several days. The key objectives of this study are to:

  • Assess the economic costs of the recent floods on the sugarcane farmers – sugar cane production and household livelihood and cane access roads and farm drainage infrastructure; and
  • Identify policy options for minimising flood related disaster risk in the sugar belt of Fiji.


Lal, P.N., Rita, R. and Khatri, N. (2009). Economic Costs of the 2009 Floods in the Fiji Sugar Belt and Policy Implications. Gland, Switzerland: IUCN. xi + 52.

© 2009 International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Climate Change: Impact on agriculture and costs of adaptation Climate Change: Impact on agriculture and costs of adaptation

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Date added: 07/11/2010
Date modified: 07/11/2010
Filesize: 1.05 MB
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The increasing pace of climate change, together with global population and income growth, threatens food security in the world. This food policy report presents research results quantifying the climate change impact, assesses the consequences for food security and estimates the investment required to offset the negative effects for humanity. It brings together, for the first time, detailed modeling of crop growth under climate change using two scenarios to simulate future climate. The research underlying this report estimates the impact of climate change on agricultural production, consumption, prices, trade, and estimates the costs of adaptation.

Authors: G. Nelson (ed); M. Rosegrant (ed); J. Koo (ed)
Publisher: International Food Policy Research Institute, 2009

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