Climate Change

Small islands, whether located in the tropics or higher latitudes, have characteristics which make them especially vulnerable to the effects of climate change, sea-level rise, and extreme events (very high confidence) ♦  Sea-level rise is expected to exacerbate inundation, storm surge, erosion and other coastal hazards, thus threatening vital infrastructure, settlements and facilities that support the livelihood of island communities (very high confidence). ♦  There is strong evidence that under most climate change scenarios, water resources in small islands are likely to be seriously compromised (very high confidence). ♦  It is very likely that subsistence and commercial agriculture on small islands will be adversely affected by climate change (high confidence). IPCC 4th Assessment Report, 2007

Climate Change and Agriculture

Documents

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Building climate resilience in the agriculture sector in Asia and the Pacific Building climate resilience in the agriculture sector in Asia and the Pacific

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Date added: 07/12/2010
Date modified: 07/12/2010
Filesize: 1.7 MB
Downloads: 2929

This report presents broad indicators of exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity in the region. A review of the indicators highlights the vulnerability of the agriculture sector as a livelihood source for many, and as a source of food security for all. The review also exposes the large heterogeneity in farming systems across Central, East, Southeast, and South Asia and the Pacific Islands, and highlights the many facets of vulnerability to climate change across the region, including undernourishment, poverty, and slowing productivity growth, all of which will be exacerbated by the effects of climate change.

Asian Development Bank and International Food Policy Research Institute.
© 2009 Asian Development Bank

An Assessment of the Impact of Climate Change on Agriculture and Food Security in the Pacific: A Cas An Assessment of the Impact of Climate Change on Agriculture and Food Security in the Pacific: A Cas

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Date added: 05/20/2011
Date modified: 05/20/2011
Filesize: 794.53 kB
Downloads: 2733

An Assessment of the Impact of Climate Change on Agriculture and Food Security in the Pacific: A Case study in Vanuatu

This study was undertaken in accordance with the above recommendations of the 6th and 7th Meetings of the Ministers of Agriculture from the Pacific Islands. A desk review of existing climate change related reports and publications on Vanuatu was undertaken from October 8 to October 20 and an in-country consultation carried out from 22 October to 8 November 2007.

Prepared for FAO SAPA Apia, Samoa

Author: Muliagatele Joe Reti Pacific Environment Consultants Ltd (PECL)
Date: November 2007

World Livestock 2011 – Livestock in food security World Livestock 2011 – Livestock in food security

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Date added: 11/14/2011
Date modified: 11/14/2011
Filesize: 1.81 MB
Downloads: 2714

Although much has been said about livestock’s role in achieving food security, in reality, the subject has been only partially addressed and no current document fully covers the topic. This report is an attempt to fill the gap. It expands the 2009 State of Food and Agriculture (SOFA) (FAO, 2009b) section which examined the multiple roles played by livestock in the food security of the poor and advocated for support of smallholders, both in responding to opportunities in livestock production and in finding other opportunities within a broad rural development strategy.

FAO. 2011. World Livestock 2011 – Livestock in food security. Rome, FAO.

Food security in the Pacific and East Timor and its vulnerability to climate change Food security in the Pacific and East Timor and its vulnerability to climate change

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Date added: 11/14/2011
Date modified: 11/14/2011
Filesize: 2.68 MB
Downloads: 2695

This report deals with food security and climate change in 15 Pacific Island economies in terms of the four traditional food security pillars:

1. Adequacy (enough food on a consistent basis, either through local production or imports or food assistance from outside sources);

2. Availability (ability of households and individuals to acquire food);

3. Stability (resilience of food supplies to external shocks, such as natural disasters);

4. Utilisation of food at the household level, especially by those with low incomes (requiring that people are healthy enough to process the food internally, and have adequate safe water and sanitation and food hygiene and child-care skills).

In the Pacific context, safety and nutrition (food that is fresh or properly preserved and contributes to a healthy diet) are equally important and are included as a fifth pillar. Adequate food security has existed only intermittently in the region in the past and food shortages and famine conditions continue to occur, largely as a result of natural weather-related events.

Prepared for the Australian Government Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency by the Secretariat of the Pacific Community in conjunction with CSIRO

© Commonwealth of Australia 2011

Achieving food security in the face of climate change Achieving food security in the face of climate change

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Date added: 12/07/2011
Date modified: 02/07/2012
Filesize: 1.27 MB
Downloads: 2346

Achieving food security in the face of climate change

Summary for policy makers from the Commission on Sustainable Agriculture and Climate Change

Business as usual in our globally interconnected food system will not bring us food security and environmental sustainability. Several converging threats – from climate change, population growth and unsustainable use of resources – are steadily intensifying pressure on humanity and world governments to transform the way food is produced, distributed and consumed.

Commissioners:

Professor Sir John Beddington, Chair, United Kingdom. Dr Mohammed Asaduzzaman, Bangladesh. Dr Adrian Fernández, Mexico. Dr Megan Clark, Australia. Dr Marion Guillou, France. Professor Molly Jahn, United States. Professor Lin Erda, China. Professor Tekalign Mamo, Ethiopia. Dr Nguyen Van Bo, Viet Nam. Dr Carlos A Nobre, Brazil. Professor Robert Scholes, South Africa. Dr Rita Sharma, India. Professor Judi Wakhungu, Kenya.

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