Climate Change

Small islands, whether located in the tropics or higher latitudes, have characteristics which make them especially vulnerable to the effects of climate change, sea-level rise, and extreme events (very high confidence) ♦  Sea-level rise is expected to exacerbate inundation, storm surge, erosion and other coastal hazards, thus threatening vital infrastructure, settlements and facilities that support the livelihood of island communities (very high confidence). ♦  There is strong evidence that under most climate change scenarios, water resources in small islands are likely to be seriously compromised (very high confidence). ♦  It is very likely that subsistence and commercial agriculture on small islands will be adversely affected by climate change (high confidence). IPCC 4th Assessment Report, 2007

Suggested Reading Materials

Documents

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Biodiversity and Livelihoods: REDD-plus Benefits Biodiversity and Livelihoods: REDD-plus Benefits

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Date added: 11/14/2011
Date modified: 11/14/2011
Filesize: 2.5 MB
Downloads: 1549

This brochure demonstrates how measures and policies can be shaped to simultaneously address climate change, biodiversity loss and poverty. It identifies opportunities for synergies and mutual enhancement of the objectives of international agreements, particularly the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), as well as decisions taken by the United Nations (UN) General Assembly following the recommendations of the UN Forum on Forests (UNFF).

Written and Published by Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity and Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (giz) GmbH
2011

Making REDD+ cross-sectoral: why, how, and what are the potential socio-economic impacts? Making REDD+ cross-sectoral: why, how, and what are the potential socio-economic impacts?

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Date added: 11/14/2011
Date modified: 11/14/2011
Filesize: 346.51 kB
Downloads: 1378

REDD+ requires countries to effectively address the drivers of deforestation and forest degradation (DD), many of which are outside the forest sector, therefore national level REDD+ strategies and their implementation will need to be cross-sectoral in their approaches.

The agriculture sector is the most important sector driving DD, and the energy sector is closely linked to forests in most developing countries through the widespread dependence on traditional biomass fuel for energy in Africa and Asia, and the increasing competition for land between biofuel feedstock production and forests, mainly in Asia and Latin America. The success of REDD+ will therefore be heavily dependent on harmonisation of REDD+, agricultural and energy objectives.

Author: Kristy Graham, Overseas Development Institute

Published in REDD net Policy Brief, August 2011

Carbon Rights in REDD+ - Policy Note Carbon Rights in REDD+ - Policy Note

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Date added: 11/14/2011
Date modified: 11/14/2011
Filesize: 2.37 MB
Downloads: 2134

The definition of carbon rights is open to many different interpretations and is likely to vary between legal contexts. In the REDD+ debate, one interpretation is that carbon can be considered as a new form of property in forest ecosystems. It has potential value because of the creation of new markets and funds aimed at reducing carbon emissions or enhancing removals. This raises legal issues surrounding how rights to carbon as property, and the associated rights to transfer and trade carbon, are determined.

This policy note summarizes what carbon rights are, how they are relevant in REDD+ and the main implications that could arise for poor and vulnerable people.

From: Peskett, L. and Brodnig, G. 2011. Carbon rights in REDD+: exploring the implications for poor and vulnerable people. World Bank and REDD-net.

Benefit Sharing in REDD+ - Policy Note Benefit Sharing in REDD+ - Policy Note

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Date added: 11/14/2011
Date modified: 11/14/2011
Filesize: 1.07 MB
Downloads: 1632

Benefit sharing is usually used in the context of REDD+ to refer to how financial incentives transferred from international funds or carbon markets are shared between actors within recipient countries. This raises questions surrounding exactly what is being shared; which actors the benefits are being shared between; and as a cross-cutting issue, the formal and informal rules that govern benefit sharing between actors.

Drawing on experience from emerging REDD+ approaches and from existing benefit sharing schemes in development policy, this policy note outlines the different components of benefit sharing systems and considers their implications for poor people.

This brief summarizes a longer paper:
Pescett, L. 2011. Benefit sharing in REDD+: Exploring the implications for poor and vulnerable people. World Bank and REDD-net.

REDD+ Benefit Sharing: a comparative assessment of three national policy approaches REDD+ Benefit Sharing: a comparative assessment of three national policy approaches

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Date added: 11/14/2011
Date modified: 11/14/2011
Filesize: 2.85 MB
Downloads: 1580

This paper reviews three leading forest sector policy approaches relevant to benefit-sharing for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+): payments for ecosystem services, also known as payments for environmental services (PES), participatory forest management (PFM), and forest concession revenue-sharing arrangements. A survey is made of these three approaches in order to draw on potential lessons for REDD+ benefit sharing. These forest management and conservation approaches are chosen due to their broad usage across tropical forest regions today and their potentially significant benefit sharing implications.

Author: John Costenbader. Jointly commissioned by the UN-REDD Programme and the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility’s Facility Management Team

01 June, 2011

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