Climate Change

Small islands, whether located in the tropics or higher latitudes, have characteristics which make them especially vulnerable to the effects of climate change, sea-level rise, and extreme events (very high confidence) ♦  Sea-level rise is expected to exacerbate inundation, storm surge, erosion and other coastal hazards, thus threatening vital infrastructure, settlements and facilities that support the livelihood of island communities (very high confidence). ♦  There is strong evidence that under most climate change scenarios, water resources in small islands are likely to be seriously compromised (very high confidence). ♦  It is very likely that subsistence and commercial agriculture on small islands will be adversely affected by climate change (high confidence). IPCC 4th Assessment Report, 2007

Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment Tools

Documents

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Participatory Learning and Action 60. Community-based adaptation to climate change Participatory Learning and Action 60. Community-based adaptation to climate change

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Date added: 07/12/2010
Date modified: 07/12/2010
Filesize: 1.38 MB
Downloads: 1585

The articles in this issue on participatory learning and action focus on the recent approaches to adaptation to climate change utilizing the priorities, knowledge and capacities of local people. Community-based adaptation draws on participatory approaches and methods developed in both disaster risk reduction and community development work and sectoral-specific approaches. The issue describes how community-based approaches to climate change have emerged, and the similarities and differences between the relatively new field of CBA and other participatory development and disaster risk reduction approaches

Publisher: International Institute for Environment and Development
2009

Making Adaptation Count - Concepts and Options for Monitoring and Evaluation of Climate Change Adapt Making Adaptation Count - Concepts and Options for Monitoring and Evaluation of Climate Change Adapt

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Date added: 11/14/2011
Date modified: 11/14/2011
Filesize: 1.01 MB
Downloads: 2582

Making Adaptation Count - Concepts and Options for Monitoring and Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation

Aimed at development practitioners and decision makers, this publication offers a roadmap for designing M&E systems for climate change adaptation that help fulfil core principles of aid effectiveness. It brings together the latest thinking on adaptation and practical experiences from development cooperation, building on the work of the World Resources Institute (WRI), as well as the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH on behalf of the German Federal Ministryfor Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ).

It argues that M&E systems need to enable results-based management, promote flexibility, and support iterative learning as the world grapples with the uncertainties of climate change impacts.

Published by Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH

Authors: Margaret Spearman / Heather McGray, World Resources Institute

Date: July 2011

Indicators to assess community‐level social vulnerability to climate change: An addendum to SocMon a Indicators to assess community‐level social vulnerability to climate change: An addendum to SocMon a

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Date added: 05/23/2011
Date modified: 05/23/2011
Filesize: 621.13 kB
Downloads: 1851

Indicators to assess community‐level social vulnerability to climate change: An addendum to SocMon and SEMPasifika regional socioeconomic monitoring guidelines
- First Draft for Public Circulation and Field Testing April 2011

The purpose of this addendum is to provide a minimum set of socioeconomic indicators related to climate change. These can be included in a socioeconomic assessment of any site for which climate change impacts are an important issue. The resulting information can then inform coastal management needs and adaptive management. This document is being added to regional socioeconomic monitoring guidelines produced by the Global Socioeconomic Monitoring Initiative for Coastal Management (SocMon)1 and its Pacific counterpart, SEM‐Pasifika.

Authors: Supin Wongbusarakum and Bob Pomeroy
Date: April 2011

The Nature Conservancy and the NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program.

Index insurance and climate risk: prospects for development and disaster management Index insurance and climate risk: prospects for development and disaster management

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Date added: 07/12/2010
Date modified: 09/09/2010
Filesize: 2.01 MB
Downloads: 1306

This document looks at the risk assessment tools such as index insurance that can be used to help vulnerable people deal with climate change. Index insurance, which can be applied across a diverse range of weather-related risk problems, from loss of crops due to drought, to loss of livestock, to losses resulting from hurricanes, offers new opportunities for managing climate risk in developing countries. If designed and introduced carefully, the authors emphasise, it has the potential to contribute significantly. However, this potential has some significant challenges that must first be addressed.

Authors: M., E. Hellmuth (ed); D., E. Osgood (ed); A. Moorhead (ed)
Publisher: International Research Institute for Climate Prediction, Columbia University, 2009

Guidelines for Community Vulnerability Analysis – An approach for Pacific Island Countries Guidelines for Community Vulnerability Analysis – An approach for Pacific Island Countries

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Date added: 07/12/2010
Date modified: 05/23/2011
Filesize: 4.27 MB
Downloads: 1169

The report is meant to be used as a manual to assist disaster managers, community development experts and communities themselves in addressing disaster risks. It aims to provide guidelines for community vulnerability analysis and for action planning to reduce natural disaster impacts in communities in Pacific Island Countries. Guidance is provided in ways of working with community to analyse its disaster vulnerability, identify priorities and plan actions to improve the community risk profile.

Author: South Pacific Disaster Reduction Programme (RAS/92/360)
Publisher: The South Pacific Programme Office of the United Nations Department for Humanitarian Affairs and the United Nations Department for Economic and Social Affairs
Date: March 1998

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