Climate Change

Small islands, whether located in the tropics or higher latitudes, have characteristics which make them especially vulnerable to the effects of climate change, sea-level rise, and extreme events (very high confidence) ♦  Sea-level rise is expected to exacerbate inundation, storm surge, erosion and other coastal hazards, thus threatening vital infrastructure, settlements and facilities that support the livelihood of island communities (very high confidence). ♦  There is strong evidence that under most climate change scenarios, water resources in small islands are likely to be seriously compromised (very high confidence). ♦  It is very likely that subsistence and commercial agriculture on small islands will be adversely affected by climate change (high confidence). IPCC 4th Assessment Report, 2007

Pacific

Documents

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Economic impact of natural disasters on development in the Pacific Economic impact of natural disasters on development in the Pacific

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Date added: 07/12/2010
Date modified: 07/12/2010
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This report responds to a lack in practical materials for measuring the impacts of natural disasters. It comprises two key resources:
i) a research report which demonstrates how past natural hazards in Fiji, Niue, Tuvalu and Vanuatu have resulted in significant short-term and long-term direct, indirect and intangible impacts.
ii) a practical guide for estimating the direct, indirect and macroeconomic impacts of natural disasters, both in the short and long term, on development in the Pacific.

Authors: E. McKenzie; B. Prasad; A. Kaloumaira
Publisher: Australian Agency for International Development, 2006

Disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation in the Pacific: The challenge of integration Disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation in the Pacific: The challenge of integration

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Date added: 07/12/2010
Date modified: 07/12/2010
Filesize: 2.69 MB
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Integrating community based disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA)is identified at the policy and practical level as crucial to aid effectiveness. Successful integration reduces both duplication of efforts and confusion at the community level. This research focuses on Pacific community based DRR and CCA initiatives, and draws upon the knowledge and insight of key stakeholders from multiple backgrounds to develop an understanding of the current status of DRR and CCA in the region.

Authors: A. Gero, K. Méheux and D. Dominey-Howes
Australian Tsunami Research Centre – Natural Hazards Research Laboratory, University of New South Wales, Sydney
Date: April 2010

Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment for Fiji Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment for Fiji

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Date added: 07/12/2010
Date modified: 07/12/2010
Filesize: 2.12 MB
Downloads: 5254

In order to develop and implement appropriate cliamte change response strategies, it is essential to establish a comprehensive baseline of the current situation in Fiji and an understanding of the effects of climate change, the degree of vulnerability and the national capacity to adapt. This has been achieved, in this current vulnerability and adaptation assessment, by using Viti Levu for an in-depth case study.

International Global Change Institute (IGCI)
University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand in partnership with South Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) and Pacific Islands Climate Change Assistance Programme (PICCAP), Fiji Country Team
January 2000

Modeling Climate Change Impacts on Viti Levu (Fiji) and Aitutaki (Cook Islands) Modeling Climate Change Impacts on Viti Levu (Fiji) and Aitutaki (Cook Islands)

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Date added: 10/14/2010
Date modified: 10/14/2010
Filesize: 6.49 MB
Downloads: 5164

A Final Report Submitted to Assessments of Impacts and Adaptations to Climate Change (AIACC), Project No. SIS09

An important activity of the Pacific Islands Climate Change Assistance Programme (PICCAP), which was a Global Environment Fund (GEF) funded enabling activity, was the development of integrated assessment models to support both Vulnerability and Adaptation (V&A) assessments and capacity building in Pacific island states.2 The unique aspect of this work was the linking, through interdisciplinary collaboration, of climate change data, models, and projections with sets of sectoral impact models at the island scale, for both temporal and spatial analyses. Under PICCAP, there were two such modeling developments. The first was VANDACLIM–The Islands Version (for a fictitious country), a software tool in support of training in V&A assessment.3 The generic developments for VANDACLIM fueled the development of a set of prototype integrated assessment models for real places in the Pacific, like Rarotonga (Cook Islands), Viti Levu (Fiji) and Tawara (Kiribati).

Submitted by Dr Kanayathu Koshy
Published by The International START Secretariat
2007

Three linked risks for development in the Pacific Islands: Climate Change, Natural Disasters and Co Three linked risks for development in the Pacific Islands: Climate Change, Natural Disasters and Co

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Date added: 05/20/2011
Date modified: 05/20/2011
Filesize: 181.04 kB
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Three linked risks for development in the Pacific Islands: Climate Change, Natural Disasters and Conflict

Pacific Island countries are demonstrably vulnerable to the risks of climate change, disasters and conflict. This paper outlines the conceptual links between these risks, briefly describes how each of the risks operates in the Pacific Islands , and goes on to demonstrate the interaction of climate change, disasters and potential for conflict in the Pacific Islands, by applying a new conceptual framework to some illustrative case studies.

Authors: Tony Weir and Zahira Virani
Date: July 2010
PACE-SD Occasional Paper No. 2010/3

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